Simply Fast WordPress [7] 1000x Faster WordPress Tuning – HHVM

This is a series of articles explaining how to speed up WordPress, the use of which is growing rapidly for CMS-based business sites and media sites. In the next few articles, I will offer techniques to tune WordPress’ speed by 1000x. --Kengyu Nakamura, Prime Strategy Co., Ltd.

In the previous article, we installed PHP 7 to get double the performance of PHP 5, and sped up WordPress 12.5x the default environment.

In this article, we are going to continue tuning by installing Facebook’s PHP-compatible HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine).

Simply Fast WordPress [6] 1000x Faster WordPress Tuning – PHP 7

This is a series of articles explaining how to speed up WordPress, the use of which is growing rapidly for CMS-based business sites and media sites. In the next few articles, I will offer techniques to tune WordPress’ speed by 1000x. --Kengyu Nakamura, Prime Strategy Co., Ltd.

In the previous article, we created a PHP5.6+OPCache+APCu environment by installing EPEL and Remi repositories, and sped up WordPress 5.5x the default environment.

In this article we will switch to PHP 7 and improve performance even more.

Simply Fast WordPress [5] 1000x Faster WordPress Tuning – PHP 5.6, OPCache, and APCu

This is a series of articles explaining how to speed up WordPress, the use of which is growing rapidly for CMS-based business sites and media sites. In the next few articles, I will offer techniques to tune WordPress’ speed by 1000x. --Kengyu Nakamura, Prime Strategy Co., Ltd.

In the previous articles we setup WordPress using CentOS 7 on Amazon Web Services (AWS) virtual cloud server Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and discovered techniques to speed up the site 5.4x faster. We only used repositories available from the standard CentOS 7 environment and configured gzip, Tuned, event MPM, and php-fpm.

In the next set of articles, we will speed up WordPress even more by using repositories outside of CentOS 7 and install PHP 5.6, PHP 7, HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine), and Nginx to further tune our machine. This will all lead up to an Nginx+HHVM configuration that is 18x faster than the default environment without using page caching. Furthermore, we will achieve 1000x more performance in requests per second by adding Nginx’s FastCGI cache to enable page caching.

From here on, we will mostly be focused on requests per second rather than page load time. This is because as we continue to tune, we will no longer be able to overcome latency inherent in page load time, so measurement becomes less reliable.